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A Decorated Persian Clay Bowl, Tepe Giyan, ca. 1600 - 1200 BCE

MP1806

Vessel decoration during the 2nd millennium BC mostly appeared on fine art rather than utilitarian vessels, the latter being too numerous to make decoration worthwhile.  This large example, of buff-colored earthenware, features a richly painted geometric diamond net motif around the cylindrical body.

Background:  The origins of the Western ceramic tradition can be traced back to the Near East.  While most Near Eastern cultures produced ceramic beyond utilitarian function at some point, Iran had had the longest and most dynamic tradition that spanned at least five thousand years.  Nearby Mesopotamia moved on from ceramics as a fine art form in the fourth millennium BC, contrasting Iran who produced artistic ceramic well into the second millennium BC and marking themselves as one of the greatest ceramic achievements throughout history.  Ref: Kawami, Trudy S.  "Ancient Iranian Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections." New York: The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation, 1992.

Dimensions: Height: 6  in (15.24 cm), Width: 6 1/2  in (16.51 cm)

Condition: Intact and in very good condition overall.

Provenance: The Hauge Collection of Ancient & Iranian Art, assembled between 1962 and 1966.


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