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EC6102

An Important Egyptian Funerary Cone for the Hereditary Prince Amunhotep called Huy, ca 1550-1295 B.C.

From the time of Amenhotep III, of conical form the oval face with impressed text in raised relief reads, "The venerated one in the presence of Osiris, the hereditary prince Amunhotep called Huy, praised in the whole of Egypt, son of the dignitary Hepu."  

Reference: Macadam and Davies, "Corpus of Inscribed Funerary Cones," #10; Teeter et al. 2003: 173

Notes
・Davies said that one example was unearthed by a French mission at Medinet Habu and later in 1936, another example was found by Nelson a little to the south (01-027 in Davies's notebook and 03-075 in Macadam's Red file). One example was unearthed at Medinet Habu (Teeter et al. 2003: 173).
・Davies_cone_028_2, a squeeze preserved in the Griffith Institute at Oxford, was made with a brick since two seal impressions are shown there (see the figure below).
・The owner ascribed is identical to those of # 40, # 65, and # 622/A.11.
・As for pA n Dl m rk tpj-tA, see Varille 1968: 106 – 111 but Macadam takes it as a name and reads 'pA n DAn...(He of Djal...(?))' (05-021 & 048 in his DALEX file 1).
・The tomb of Amunhotep, son of Hapu (Huy) is popularly believed to be Nr. -396- because Bidoli reported that a local Qurnawi informed him that Amunhotep's cones (exact type is not known. Either # 10, # 40, or # 65) were found around it (Bidoli 1970 [MDAIK 26]: 12). However, the tomb itself does not have inscriptions of his name and titles, and we do not know what types, how many, and exactly where the cones were found. Needless to say, reports from local people should not be accepted without careful scrutiny.
・See also 03-076 in Macadam's Red file, 05-01, 102, & 103 in his DALEX file 1, and 06-061, 080, & 110 in his DALEX file 2.

Amunhotep son of Hapu was celebrated throughout the remaining centuries of Egyptian history, long after his lifetime, as the exemplar of the wise counsellor and honorable servant of the king. He seemed genuinely to be a man of exceptional probity and talents. He enjoyed an outstanding career as King’s Scribe, Scribe of Recruits and the ancient office of Overseer of all the workers of the King. The last appointment suggests that he was an architect and thus responsible for the immense building projects which Amenhotep III commissioned. The Zenith of his career came during his master’s (Amenhotep III) first sed or jubilee festival when among other honors, he took the role of the crown prince in a re-enactment of the king’s accession. He also oversaw the construction of the Colossi of Memnon. On his death at what was reputed to be of a very great age, the son of Hapu was given the singular honor for a commoner of a mortuary temple in western Thebes close by the temple dedicated to the perpetuity of the kings.. Like theirs, Amenhotep’s temple was to be endowed for all time and his cult flourished at least into the period of the Ramesside kings. He was especially revered as a sage and many proverbs and sayings of wisdom were attributed to him. More than a thousand years after his death these were translated into Greek and he was worshipped as a god in Ptolemaic times.

The Amenhotep Curse:   the deceased 18th dynasty administrator threatened anyone who would damage his tomb of funerary cult with a list of punishments: they would lose their earthly possessions and honors, be incinerated in a furnace in execration rites, capsize and drown at sea, have no successors, receive no tomb or funerary offerings of their own, and their bodies would decay “because they will starve without sustenance and their bones will perish”.

Dimensions:  Length: 16.5cm, Face width: 6cm

Condition:  Red wash to the impressed face, with small losses to the tail that do not detract.  Custom mounted. 

Provenance:  Dr. U. Mueller private collection, Switzerland acquired 1968-1978.

 

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